Meet The Poet: Katie Hale

 

Meet one of the poets on our Poets in Residence project at Theatre by the Lake. The project will involve seven emerging writers spending time at the theatre, and will culminate in a showcase on September 7th 2013, at which their poems will be read by members of the theatre’s summer season acting company.

 

Katie Hale

Born in Cumbria, Katie has been published in Poetry Review, The Frogmore Papers and Cadaverine, as well as anthologies such as 11 Poets and Eloquence in Times of Crisis. She has twice won the Anne Pierson Award, and was recently a member of Barbican Young Poets. She is currently studying for an MLitt in Creative Writing at the University of St Andrews, where she is working on a pamphlet which she hopes to publish in the not-too-distant future. She is also the birth-mother of [insert text here].

Read an example of her poetry here.

Meet The Poet: Phoebe Power

Meet one of the poets on our Poets in Residence project at Theatre by the Lake. The project will involve seven emerging writers spending time at the theatre, and will culminate in a showcase on September 7th 2013, at which their poems will be read by members of the theatre’s summer season acting company.

Phoebe Power photo

Phoebe Power was a winner of one of the 2012 Eric Gregory Awards. She was also a Foyle Young Poet of the Year in 2009, and her poems have appeared in magazines including MagmaOrbis and Cadaverine. Phoebe is based in Penrith near the Lake District, and currently studying English at Cambridge, where she runs Pembroke Poetry Society. You can find her work at phoebepower.blogspot.co.uk.

Phoebe was also published in the [insert text here] zine, Dawn Killing Darkness. To read her poem, click here.

Poets by the Lake

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Poets being shown around the plant room, Theatre by the Lake

Tuesday March 26th saw the beginning of an exciting project at Theatre by the Lake in Keswick, Cumbria.

Seven emerging poets spent a fascinating afternoon exploring the theatre and speaking to people who worked there, in many of its different departments. The tour led us from centre-stage surrounded by the set of the current production (Rogue Herries), to the plant room hidden away at the back of the building. From the very public, to the very private – the afternoon was eye-opening and intriguing.

Equally interesting were the stories of the theatre’s various employees, which were as different as the jobs they perform, many of which caught the imagination of at least a couple of the poets.

The day ended for some with a great spread of ‘nibbles’ (a description which rather undervalued the amount of food present), put on by Bob and his catering team. Then four of the poets stayed on to watch that evening’s performance of Rogue Herries.

It was a fascinating day, and I’m sure will provide plenty of inspiration for all the poets involved.

The project will culminate in a showcase on September 7th 2013, with poems read by the theatre’s summer season actors.

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A good end to a fascinating day – Theatre by the Lake

Submit to Beneath The Boughs (April)

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This is the third of our monthly calls for submissions for Beneath The Boughs. The call for poems from February and March yielded some great results, and we’d love to continue receiving your fantastic poetry for our upcoming summer exhibition, ‘Beneath The Boughs’. (The exhibition will run from July 19th to September 9th 2013. Read more about the project here.)

For a chance to be involved in the exhibition, and to have your work displayed in the beautiful historic gardens of Lowther Castle, send us your poem(s) inspired by the above photo, and the theme of DISCOVERY.

Please ensure that we receive your submission(s) by the deadline of 23:59, Tuesday 30th April, 2013.

For information on how to submit, as well as submission guidelines, click here.

(If you really aren’t inspired by this theme and photo, then you can also send us a poem inspired by one of the pictures in our insipration gallery. Remember, the same guidelines and deadline apply.)

And keep your eyes peeled. There’ll be a new prompt here in May!

(Although we are posting new monthly poetry prompts for the exhibition until June, the earlier you send in your work, the more chance you have of getting it displayed, so don’t dawdle too long! Looking forward to seeing your work.)

Submit to ‘Beneath The Boughs’ (March)

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Welcome to the second of our monthly calls for submissions for Beneath The Boughs. February’s call for poems yielded some great results, and we’d love to continue receiving your fantastic poetry for our upcoming summer exhibition, ‘Beneath The Boughs’. (The exhibition will run from July 19th to September 9th 2013. Read more about the project here.)

For a chance to be involved in the exhibition, and to have your work displayed in the beautiful historic gardens of Lowther Castle, send us your poem(s) inspired by the above photo, and the theme of REMNANTS.

Please ensure that we receive your submission(s) by the deadline of 23:59, Sunday 1st March, 2013.

For information on how to submit, as well as submission guidelines, click here.

(If you really aren’t inspired by this theme and photo, then you can also send us a poem inspired by one of the pictures in our insipration gallery. Remember, the same guidelines and deadline apply.)

And keep your eyes peeled. There’ll be a new prompt here in April!

(Although we are posting new monthly poetry prompts for the exhibition until June, the earlier you send in your work, the more chance you have of getting it displayed, so don’t dawdle too long! Looking forward to seeing your work.)

‘The poem acquires independence…’

‘There is a process called annealment, the heating to a high temperature and slow cooling of glass or metal, to toughen them. Making a poem feels like that, writing as yourself and reading it back as someone else. Distance, perspective, irony, derision (terribly important!), all come into the picture. The poem acquires independence, the poet, in Montale’s comparison, is like the props man who’s stumbled upon it, “unaware that he’s / the author”.’

– Michael Hoffman, “I happen to believe” (2000)

Books:

We think this is true.

‘I write to find out what I didn’t know I knew.’

‘Cosmopolibackofbeyondism’ – Robert Crawford

‘Cosmopolibackofbeyondism is a creed with a wink in it. Poetry’s obsessions – love, death, God, sound, silence – travel across times and cultures; nothing could be more cosmopolitan. At the same time, verse is a marginal act, operating way out at the back of beyond, at the limits of what can be said. Its centrality and marginality are bonded.

Every poem is an island. To get to a poem requires sailing out from the mainland of routine language. Some poems are close to shore, others much further away; on every island it is possible to feel remote and at home. A poem is defined by the rugged shore of its right-hand margin, cutting it off from prose. Yet just as any poem-island has the tang of the back of beyond, it has, too, aspects, shared speech-forms, political shapes, faiths, which link it to other places. All poems are connected, most simply through the shared cosmopolis of verse.’

– Robert Crawford, Cosmopolibackofbeyondism (2000)

‘Art’s whatever you choose to frame…’

‘…a poem is simply a piece of writing which, when I read it, I recognise as a poem and not just as something pretending to be one. What is the difference between poetry and prose? Prose fills the page-width; a poem has white space around it. (‘Art’s whatever you choose to frame,’ as I found myself writing at the end of a poem about how looking at paintings in a gallery changes one’s view of the world outside.)’

– Fleur Adcock, Not Quite a Statement (2000)